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Showing posts from October, 2010

The Components of a Process

I often get asked what goes into a Process Definition Document (PDD).  Certified Process Design Engineers (CPDE) learn that PDDs should  include:
PoliciesA process overviewRoles and ResponsibilitiesProcess MapsActivitiesVocabularyPolicies
Policies specific to a process should be included in the Process Definition Document.  A policy is a formal document that describes the overall intentions and direction of a service provider, as expressed by senior management. Company policies are used to guide actions toward a specific outcome. They must be specific, measurable and underpinned by the process. 

Overview
The overview section contains the process description, objectives, goals, owner boundaries, triggers, supplier data, inputs, high level activities, outputs, customers and metrics.

Roles and Responsibilities
Roles and responsibilities define and describe the active participants in the process, including the process owner, process manager, suppliers, customers and stakeholders. A RACI mod…

CPDE and Six Sigma

I was asked recently how Certified Process Design Engineer® (CPDE) and Six Sigma might work together. I was also asked to clarify the value of holding a Certified Process Design Engineer® certification. To deal with these questions we must first clarify the difference between CPDE® and Six Sigma. First CPDE® is a role and a set of methods and approaches for that role to use in defining, designing and implementing strong IT Service Management processes. Six Sigma is a quality framework based on the work of men like W. Edwards Deming, Joseph Juran and Philip Crosby (the Big Three of the quality movement) and developed out of Motorola’s efforts to improve quality. The two are not at odds, rather they complement each other.
A CPDE has the skills to look at an organization, understand its culture, its approach to process and quality and its need for improvement. Once this assessment is done (using tools like the ITIL Process Maturity Framework, or CMMI) the CPDE would identify which element…

ITSM Learnings from Fusion 2010

I recently attended a great opportunity to connect, learn and grow at the itSMF USA Fusion 10 Conference in Louisville, Kentucky. It was a wonderful chance to see old friends and acquaintances, to meet and make new friends and learn from some of the most articulate and impressive speakers on ITSM and ITIL available in the industry. I came away with some key points that I thought I would share with you so you can also gain the benefit and value of the data, information, knowledge and wisdom presented at the Conference.
Here are my key takeaways: Service Management is alive and well. A new wave of users and supporters has emerged and were present at the show. I saw and met so many new people. I was impressed that ITSM and ITIL has not simply remained in the hands of a core group of users but has found continued life among new industries and implementers. ITSM and ITIL seem to be growing especially among colleges and university IT departments and in the medical and scientific fields as wel…

Why Use a RACI Matrix?

Not too long ago, I was involved in a post implementation meeting for a change that was not very successful. During the meeting there was a very heated discussion, some of the comments I heard were:  ‘I thought you were going to do that’ ‘That is not my responsibility” ‘Why wasn’t I informed that this was occurring’ 'I have the responsibility, but not the authority to get the job done' ‘I knew how to fix the issue, but no one ever asked me’   It occurred to me that having a RACI chart would address these comments. The RACI model is a straight forward tool used for identifying activities and relating them to roles and responsibilities, thus avoiding confusion over who does what and how people are involved. The acronym RACI stands for:  Responsible: This role is responsible for the correct execution of process and activities. This person or persons do the work to achieve the task. Accountable: This role has ownership of the quality and the end result of the process. This must be one pe…

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