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Certified Process Design Engineer (CPDE)

There are many frameworks and standards that define best practices for achieving quality IT service management (ITSM) - ITIL, ISO/IEC 20000, COBIT, CMMI, DevOps, Knowledge-Centered Support, etc. While each describes processes and controls (what to do), none provide clear, step-by-step methods and techniques for actually designing, re-engineering and improving processes (how to do it).

IT organizations must not only do the right things, but they must also do the right things right. CPDE takes a practical step by step approach to developing and implementing ITSM processes across the entire lifecycle of IT services. It ensures integration with project and program management and the application and software development processes as well. Allowing for strategic, tactical and operational alignment across the entire organization. CPDE is well suited to utilize these different best practices and additionally play a significant role in the DevOps movement that is taking hold in IT organizations across the globe.

In a dynamic marketplace, IT must deliver technology solutions that underpin and support business processes and business outcomes. Through the use of these well designed, well implemented and well aligned ITSM processes CPDE can help to substantially aid the IT organization in:
  • Aligning IT efforts to business goals through increasing the use of real time information for analysis in up to the minute decision making, thus delivering greater value to the organization.
  • Improve compliance with regulatory controls by integrating those policies into our ITSM processes.
  • Understand the cause of both risk and cost and enable inventive processes to reduce both.
  • Achieve both customer and employee satisfaction by delivering innovative tools, services and processes that continue to meet their changing needs.
The tools, techniques and templates from the CPDE course will allow you to take your approach and documentation to a whole new level. The course shows you how to simplify and streamline your processes, saving time and money in your redesign efforts.

Want to learn more? - http://www.itsmacademy.com/cpde

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