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Financial Management and SACM KPIs

A learner who is working towards developing a Cost Management department recently asked about key performance indicators (KPIs) for the Financial Management and Service Asset and Configuration Management (SACM) processes.    

ITIL 2011 actually maps Critical Success Factors (CSFs) to KPIs for each process.  Key performance indicators for Financial Management can be found in section 4.3.8 of the Service Strategy book while those for SACM can be found in section 4.3.8 of the Service Transition book.

While I cannot list all of the KPIs for both processes, here is a good sample:

Financial Management
  • The financial management for IT services framework specifies how services will be accounted for, and regular reports are submitted and used as a basis for measuring the service provider’s performance.
  • All strategies have a comprehensive analysis of investment and returns, conducted with information from financial management for IT services.
  • Internal service providers receive the funding required to provide the agreed services – showing a break-even at the end of the financial planning period.
  • Customer and service assets are recorded in the configuration management system, and all required financial information is complete.
  • Regular reports are produced on the costs and utilization of customer and service assets and action plans are targeted for any deviations from required performance or utilization.
  • The cost of each service is reported on a monthly, quarterly and/or annual basis, and compared with the return achieved by that service
  • The service provider uses an accounting system, and this is configured to report on its costs by service.
  • Regular reports are provided on the costs of services in design, transition and operation.
  • Improved accuracy in budgets and charges for the assets utilized by each customer or business unit
  • Increase in re-use and redistribution of under-utilized resources and assets
  • Reduction in the use of unauthorized hardware and software
  • Reduction in the average time and cost of diagnosing and resolving incidents and problems
  • Improved ratio of used licences against paid-for licences
  • Improvement in time to identify poor-performing and poor-quality assets
  • Reduction in risks due to early identification of unauthorized change
  • Increased quality and accuracy of configuration information
Service Asset and Configuration Management
  • Improved accuracy in budgets and charges for the assets utilized by each customer or business unit
  • Increase in re-use and redistribution of under-utilized resources and assets
  • Reduction in the use of unauthorized hardware and software
  • Reduction in the average time and cost of diagnosing and resolving incidents and problems
  • Improved ratio of used licences against paid-for licences
  • Improvement in time to identify poor-performing and poor-quality assets
  • Reduction in risks due to early identification of unauthorized change
  • Increased quality and accuracy of configuration information

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