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Types of Work / Process Outputs

Dr. Michael Hammer and his co-author James Champy wrote the groundbreaking work Re-Engineering the Corporation. Dr. Hammer has long championed the concepts of using processes to accomplish work outputs and outcomes. Dr. Hammer spoke of three categories of work (or process output). Because a service can be defined as "work done for others," we can equate the types of work described by Hammer with the categories of services described by ITIL. The three categories of work according to Hammer are:

·   Value-Add (ITIL Core services): This type of work (or services) provides direct value in the form of utility and warranty to the customers and users. Customers pay directly for this work or services. This work generates the revenue of your organization. This is "why you exist" and "what you do" as a business.
·   Non Value-Add (ITIL Enabling and Enhancing services): This type of work supports, underpins and enables your Value-Add work or Core Services. This work (or supporting services) does not provide direct value, rather makes it possible to provide direct value by enabling or enhancing your core work or services. Customers pay indirectly for the services in prorated methods spread across the entire customer or user base. This work (or services) is your overhead, and this helps pay your bills.
·   Waste: This work brings little or no value to your customers or users. This work does not help you achieve your business goals or customer requirements. Customers do not and should not pay for work that provides no value. This type of work should be eliminated and the particular target of continual process and service improvement.
By focusing on core services first, then enabling and enhancing services and working to eliminate waste, an organization can achieve great success. The ITIL processes help you focus on value-laden work and services. By following the best practice guidance of both ITIL and Dr. Hammer you can meet the needs of your customers and users.

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