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Next Steps

In an earlier blog I had talked about the need for organizations to have the ability to measure their processes against those of their competition or some defined industry standard.  Before that could happen, it had to be determined if your processes are mature enough to ensure that you can gather the needed data for a successful undertaking.  

If your assessment calls for developing a new process, reengineering or improving an existing process a sound methodology for that mission could be the “Ten process design and improvement steps” as describe in “The ITSM Process Design Guide by Donna Knapp.The elegance of this approach is that it can be utilized to design or improve any process regardless of maturity level.  It provides the common vocabulary, tools, and techniques needed to engage all participants who would be required for these process and improvement actions.  They help to define and understand the end to end process, who the customers are and their requirements.  It also allows you to levelset the process with your organizational structure, related processes and the available technologies.  It also provides the mechanism to allow for continual process improvement.

The ten process design and improvement steps are grouped into the following four logical phases.

          Requirements Definition-Requirements Definition Document
  1. Determine management’s vision and level of commitment.
  2. Establish project and form project team.
  3. Define process and identify customer requirements

     Process Analysis-Gap Analysis Report
  4. Document the as is process and baseline current performance.
  5. Assess conformance to customer requirements.
  6. Benchmark current performance.

    Process Design and Implementation-Process Definition Document
  7. Design or redesign process.
  8. Solicit feedback, fine tune, and finalize the design.
  9. Implement new design.

    Continual Process Improvement-Maturity Assessments and Metrics
  10. Assess performance and continually improve.

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