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Event Management

Event Management is the process that monitors all events that occur throughout the IT infrastructure. It provides the basis for normal operation (service assurance) and also detects, reports on and escalates exception conditions.
An event can be defined as any detectable or discernible occurrence that has significance for the management of the IT Infrastructure or the delivery of IT service and evaluation of the impact a deviation might cause to the services. Events are typically notifications created by an IT service, configuration item (CI) or monitoring tool.
It is unusual for an organization to appoint an “event manager” as most events tend to occur for many different reasons and will in most cases be managed by the technical or application management team whose technology or application is impacting the delivery of an associated service.  However, it is important that Event Management procedures are well defined documented and coordinated among ITIL processes and Service Operation functions. An Event Process Owner and Process Manager would carry out the generic functions of those roles.
Service Desk is not usually involved within the Event Management process unless the event has been identified as an incident which, in its initial stages, will be handled by the Service Desk who will continue to communicate about the incident throughout its lifecycle, but will typically be escalate to the appropriate functional teams for resolution.
Technical and application teams do play significant roles in Event Management during operations but also during design where they will participate in designing aspects of a service such as event classification, definitions for auto responses and reprogramming of correlation engines when necessary.  During the transition stage of the life cycle these designs will be tested to ensure that they are generating the applicable responses.  During service operations these teams will perform Event Management for the systems and applications under their control.  They may also be involved with managing any incidents or problems that arise from these events.
It is a frequent practice for event monitoring and first line response to be supervised by IT Operations Management.  Operators will be tasked with monitoring events and ensuring that they can initiate, coordinate or even perform proper documentation and when appropriate that escalations occur according to standard operating practices.   

To learn more about this topic: http://www.itsmacademy.com/itil-osa/ 

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