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The Role of Process Practitioner

The role of the Process Practitioner is by far one of the most critical, and is sometimes overlooked in lieu of others such as Process Managers and Process Owners.  Don’t misunderstand, Managers and Owners are important and are key success factors, but the Process Practitioner role is where the rubber meets the road.  This is the role assigned to individuals who will be performing the work on a day to day basis.  ITIL has always emphasized the need for clearly defined roles for Process Owners and Process Managers. ITIL also speaks to the role of Service Owner, an individual who is accountable for and represents the end-to-end service.   Within each process, there may also be roles that are designed to carry out certain process activities … these are the “Practitioners”. Without this role and skill set everything else becomes a moot point.

Successful service management dictates that specific individuals are assigned to specific roles with specific responsibilities for one or more processes.    But what about the rest of us?    Where do we fit into the service management program?  What role do we play? 

ITIL defines a key role for anyone that executes any activity within any process – the Process Practitioner.   
  
The Process Practitioner:
  • Carries out one or more process activities
  • Understands how his or her role adds to value creation
  • Works with other stakeholders to ensure contributions are effective
  • Ensures inputs, outputs and interfaces for activities are correct 
  • Creates or updates activity-based records
Process Practitioners can be internal or external staff, suppliers, consultants - even potentially users and customers.  They are the "doers" of the process and their activities may cross into multiple groups and multiple processes. 

However you choose to define your Process Practitioners, this role must be considered when designing, implementing and managing your processes.  The inclusion of a Process Practitioner role should also help organizations build and manage a RACI matrices. If you recall, a RACI model maps roles and responsibilities to tasks or activities.   Leveraging the Process Practitioner role at the highest RACI level can determine workloads and potentially identify process bottlenecks.  The feedback that is provided by the Process Practitioner is crucial for any organization that wants to continue to evolve and emerge with the ever changing business requirements and customer needs.

Practitioners must be able to apply their knowledge.  The ITIL Foundation course enables IT professionals to learn the basics of IT Service Management (the what) and the business value of well-designed and delivered services (the why). Leveraging candidates’ existing ITIL knowledge, and based on a new publication – ITIL® Practitioner Guidance – the ITIL Practitioner course goes beyond the what and the why and provides practitioners a methodical way (the how) to use the ITIL guidance to improve whether by introducing new or by changing existing services or processes.  Throughout this sixteen (16) hour case study-based course participants learn about and then apply nine guiding principles to the planning and implementation of service improvements. Participants also gain a practical understanding of how three critical competencies contribute to improvement.

For more information on ITIL Foundation please click here and for ITIL Practitioner please click here.   

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