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DevOps Testing – Do it Right

One of the key principles of DevOps stresses that we need to fail and fail fast.   A key part that frequently gets omitted.  That key element of the principle is that we fail fast so that we can LEARN. When we learn it is always best to act and to share.   In the spirit of learning and sharing here are some consequences of not performing DevOps testing properly that might help to mitigate some of your challenges.

Consequences of NOT doing DevOps testing properly – challenges and thoughts

Culture Conflict
Culture Conflict can exist between business leaders, developers, QA testers, infrastructure/tools staff, operations staff or any stakeholder in the entire value stream. When there are unclear roles and responsibilities for the testing of a new or changed service or product, a friction begins.  This friction propagates conflict.  Be aware.  Make management of organizational change a priority.

Test Escapes (False Positive)
          False Positive Test Escapes occur when the DevOps testing strategy is not
optimized across the DevOps pipeline because tests may not be sufficient to catch defects before the next stage in the pipeline, ultimately resulting in problems deployed to customers.  Do not underestimate the value of a good testing strategy for the DevOps framework that is integrated end to end.  Accelerate and automate when and where you can.  Know the DevOps Pipeline.

Test Escapes (False Negative)
False Negative Test Escapes occur when DevOps testing infrastructure failures incorrectly attribute DevOps testing failures to product failures, resulting in unnecessary, wasteful product failure diagnostic activities.  We do not want to absorb unnecessary time, resources and funding on false negative test results. Efficiency is key.

Increased Competition
Increased Competition occurs when the competitor realizes a more efficient DevOps testing capability and out performs a competitor.  Those who perform DevOps testing best are likely to lead the pack.

Even if you do not buy into the idea that we need to learn how to do more with less, this reminds us that we can always do better with what we have.  These are some very real challenges that create risk.  Pick one that is relevant to you and your organization. Start there in an iterative effort to succeed with DevOps Test Engineering for results.

Educate and Inspire:  DevOps Test Engineering



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