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DevOps Stakeholders – Who Are They?

IT professionals attending the DevOps FND Certification class offered by the DevOps Campus at ITSM Academy are sometimes surprised to discover that DevOps in not just about Dev and Ops.

The DevOps pipeline and value stream for the continuous delivery of products and services mandates that an integration of requirements and controls be orchestrated in such a way that speed and value are achieved. DevOps extends far beyond software developers and IT operations.

One way to consider the stakeholders for DevOps:

Dev Includes all people involved in developing software products and services including but not exclusive to:
  • Architects, business representatives, customers, product owners, project managers, quality assurance (QA), testers and analysts, suppliers …
Ops Includes all people involved in delivering and managing software products and services including but not exclusive to:
  • ·Information security professionals, systems engineers, system administrators, IT operations engineers, release engineers, database administrators (DBAs), network engineers, support professionals, third party vendors and suppliers…
The challenge for any DevOps initiative is how to include all systems necessary to incorporate the activities, requirements and roles that these stakeholders represent. We must radically shift our thinking. Service providers need to understand that it's not what we are doing that has to change but need to consider how we do it. We still need to deliver services that deliver value to our customers. The old way of doing things does not work in today's world. How we do things must be accelerated in order to perform. Our mission should be to clear the backlog of requests for new and changed services and deliver robust, stable services at the speed of a keystroke.

Use this link for more information on DevOps Foundation and other DevOps courses available.

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