Skip to main content

People are Important to Service Design

One of my favorite sets of analogies to use in class is food, the making of  food or restaurant operations. We make what we eat by pulling together ingredients into recipes. In the same way, we design services. We use the elements of services combined into the five aspects of design (solutions, tools, architectures, process and measurement) to produce the Service Design Package (SDP).

When we think about designing services, we must remember it takes a number of elements. ITIL v3 says there are four elements of service design:
  1. People
  2. Process
  3. Products
  4. Partners

I like to think of these elements as the “ingredients” of a service. The most important “ingredient” in any service is the “people”. We can have effective processes, efficient products, and loyal partners, but without people the service will get nowhere.
 
People are the elements that make the value for the customer truly possible. Processes do not execute themselves, products do not spontaneously build and partners are not engaged out of nothing. It takes people working together to strategize, design, transition, operate and improve a service.

So how do we ensure that the people-element of services is truly engaged? Here are some ideas:
  1.  Identify roles and responsibilities early in the design of a service and tweak or improve them as the design gets more complete
  2. Develop and execute a parallel Organizational Change Management (OCM) effort to occur alongside your service design
  3. Look for and incorporate feedback from stakeholders of services from the beginning of design not as an afterthought
  4. Identify measurements and metrics that encourage a culture of improvement, not a culture of punishment for failure
  5. Learn and apply some basic human interaction good practices within your organization (listening, interpersonal relationships, communications, work-life balance for example)

Most important is the need to see people as both the glue that holds a service together and the engine that drives the delivery of value. Do not simply say “people are your most important asset”, rather act and behave as if they really are your most important asset. 
 
Restaurants recognize that the food can be great, the atmosphere inviting and the suppliers timely, but without great staff the customers will not have a truly enjoyable experience. So put people before processes, products, and partners and you will reap the benefits!

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

What is the difference between Process Owner, Process Manager and Process Practitioner?

I was recently asked to clarify the roles of the Process Owner, Process Manager and Process Practitioner and wanted to share this with you.

Roles and Responsibilities:
Process Owner – this individual is “Accountable” for the process. They are the goto person and represent this process across the entire organization. They will ensure that the process is clearly defined, designed and documented. They will ensure that the process has a set of Policies for governance.Example: The process owner for Incident management will ensure that all of the activities to Identify, Record, Categorize, Investigate, … all the way to closing the incident are defined and documented with clearly defined roles, responsibilities, handoffs, and deliverables. An example of a policy in could be… “All Incidents must be logged”. Policies are rules that govern the process. Process Owner ensures that all Process activities, (what to do), Procedures (details on how to perform the activity) and the policies (r…

How Does ITIL Help in the Management of the SDLC?

I was recently asked how ITIL helps in the management of the SDLC (Software Development Lifecycle).  Simply put... SDLC is a Lifecycle approach to produce the software or the "product".  ITIL is a Lifecycle approach that focuses on the "service".
I’ll start by reviewing both SDLC and ITIL Lifecycles and then summarize:
SDLC  -  The intent of an SDLC process is to help produce a product that is cost-efficient, effective and of high quality. Once an application is created, the SDLC maps the proper deployment of the software into the live environment. The SDLC methodology usually contains the following stages: Analysis (requirements and design), construction, testing, release and maintenance.  The focus here is on the Software.  Most organizations will use an Agile or Waterfall approach to implement the software through the Software Development Lifecycle.
ITIL  -  is a best practice for IT service management (ITSM) that focuses on aligning IT services with the needs …

Incidents when a Defect is Involved

Question: We currently track defects in a separate system than our ticket management system. With that said, my question is does anyone have suggestions and/or best practices on how to handle incidents when a defect is involved? Should the incident be closed since the defect is being worked on in another defect tracking system if it is noted in the incident ticket? I am considering creating an incident statuses of 'closed-unresolved' so the incident can still be reported on in our ticket management system but know it is being worked on/tracked in the defect system. With defects, it is possible that we may never work on them because they are very low priority and the impact is low to the user. However, in some cases a defect is being worked on. Should we create a problem ticket instead?
Thanks, René W.

Answer: RenĂ©. In ITIL, the activity you are describing is handled by the Problem Management process. ITIL does not use the term “defect” but it does use the term “known error” to…