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WTF? Why the Failure?


Through the implementation of best practices, one of ITSM's critical success factors is to enhance the business' perception of the IT organization.  By creating a service strategy which helps to define good design, encourage effective transition processes and deliver valuable services through efficient and effective operational management, we work hard at making this goal a reality. Unfortunately, IT is often perceived to be ineffective and inefficient. 
Recently, the government’s inability to deliver a working website for the affordable care act was splashed all over  news with many of my non-IT friends and family asking, how could this happen?  How come IT people never get it right?
I want to respond with “BUT WE DO” and list many of the successes that I have been part of during my career.   But I look at them sheepishly and respond with” I don’t really know”.  As I think about this, I begin to get angry and not just because I’m an American tax payer, but because as an IT professional, I know the kinds of tools that we as an industry have at our disposal to ensure that these kinds of failures should never happen. Given the development of integrated tool sets, best practice frameworks, auditable standards and the focus on continual improvement it is inconceivable that a professional organization could deliver a product of such poor quality? Unfortunately, it happens and more often than we want to admit. 
The thing that is most disturbing for me is that ringing in my ears of “How come you IT people never get it right?”  It seems we have a lot more work in front of us, to enhance the public’s perception of our industry.  Perception is often reality and a successful service management program has to recognize and address internal and external perceptions of IT's ability and performance.   It's not easy but is quite possible when the message is one of learning from past successes and failures as part of your continual improvement.

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