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Operational Support and Analysis (OSA)

What if we did not build an operational support system to meet current business requirements?  That might sound a bit outrageous and contradictory to everything we have learned.

If you are a service provider than you are aware that what we consider premium service support today could be accepted as the norm and sometimes can be outdated before it becomes a reality.  The key to sustaining underpinning operations for any industry is in the constructs of the system.   If we build a system to provide what the customer and business outcomes require now then that is what we will have.  The likelihood is that we will have a system that provides for a service that will render itself less than optimized in a shorter time than we would like to think.

What is required is an operational support system that can deliver fast but also one that is able to shift, bend and weave with the ever-changing environment and outcomes that it supports.  We need a growing living moving system that can adapt to changing business and customer requirements.  A dynamic, not static support system.

At the core this system will need to have the capability to monitor, analyze, predict and most importantly to act.  All of this must be done at an exponential rate in order to meet the dynamic needs of our customers and strategic business requirements.  But wait… isn’t that what we have always done?

In order to build a system that is not static to today’s requirements, but rather one that can adapt to changing requirements, the core principles of best practice still apply.  For example what if we exploit Event, Incident and Problem Management systems to monitor and analyze patterns of business activity and forecast what would be required to meet future changes?  What if we could automate the feedback loops and adjust our service assets to provision and optimize business assets ahead of time?   It is difficult to exploit and build upon an operational system if our baseline is reactive or chaotic.

It all starts with knowing the important role of Operational Support and Analysis in service provision and understanding how processes interact with other Service Lifecycle processes. 

Long gone are the days when the data center was in the basement and the help desk was a necessary evil. Today, businesses are irreversibly dependent upon technology and real dollars are lost when IT services are not available.

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