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Showing posts from October, 2014

The Different Types of Service

In the Strategy stage of the Service Lifecycle there are several questions an IT service provider must ask in order to determine the services they should be delivering, whom they should be delivering them to and is value creation and capture possible.  They are:  What is our business? Who is our customer? What does the customer value? Who depends on our services? How do they use our services Why are they valuable to them?  Given the answer to those questions, the service provider can then determine the types of services to be delivered, resources needed and what risks and constraints need to be identified and managed.  
There are three types of services the provider will have to consider, supporting services, internal customer facing and external customer facing services.  Services whether internal or external are further broken down as core, enabling or enhancing.  
Here we will be looking at supporting, internal and external facing services. Supporting Services:  A service that is not …

The Evolution of a Definition

The definition of an IT service has certainly evolved:

IT Service(ITILv1):    A set of related functions provided by IT systems in support of one or more business areas, which in turn may be made up of software, hardware and communications facilities, perceived by the customer as a coherent and self-contained entity. An IT service may range from access to a single application, such as a general ledger system, to a complex set of facilities including many applications, as well as office automation, which might be spread across a number of hardware and software platforms.

IT Service(ITILv2):    A set of related components provided in support of one or more business processes. The service will comprise a range ofConfiguration Item(CI) types but will be perceived byCustomersandUsers as a self-contained, single, coherent entity.

IT Service(ITILv3):AServiceprovided to one or moreCustomers, by anIT Service Provider. An IT Service is based on the use ofInformation Technologyand supports theCusto…

Process Maturity – How can I Assess it?

A process is doomed if you ever consider it done!  Unlike an audit that examines evidence to determine compliance, a process assessment is conducted to evaluate and organizations strengths and weaknesses.  The assessor will ensure that this baseline is utilized to identify process improvement opportunities that ensure business outcomes.
The ITIL Process Maturity Framework (PMF) was defined specifically for ITSM processes and consists of five levels of maturity.
·Level One – Initial At this level there is not a defined process, there are some procedures and few results are retained. ·Level Two – Repeatable At this level of maturity there is a recognized process but the objectives are not clear and targets are not formalized. ·Level Three – Defined It is at this level of maturity that the process is defined and documented and there are agreed upon targets. ·Level Four – Managed A managed process at this level is well defined, interfaces and integrates with other processes and objectives for…

Process Maturity – Documenting the “As Is” Process

There are many challenges to defining and documenting a process for ongoing continual improvement and to ensure process maturity is in alignment with the overall business strategy and outcomes.  One such challenge is to be able to document the “As Is” process.
When documenting the “As Is” process caution must be taken not to accept the existing documentation, or flowcharts provided as the true baseline of what is really being done.  What are the current activities and procedures that are being used and what is the step by step workflow that participants and stakeholders are actually performing?  The actual is what really needs to be captured. 
The complexity of this challenge is exasperated by the fact that frequently when determining and “As Is” state for immature processes the assessor or process design engineer will discover that there is not one single process that is being followed but in fact many?  What then?
Non adherence to process is generally due to little or no governan…

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