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Recommended Reading (Part 2)

Last week, we discussed the value of having well-rounded knowledge of ITIL, ITSM, Organizational Change and Business Management in preparation for and after the Managing Across the Lifecycle (MALC) course and certification.
Here is the continuation of my recommended books.  As a lifelong learner, I am always looking for new works.   Please feel free to make additional suggestions via comments to this blog.
 

Part 2: Recommended Reading

  • Who Moved my Cheese? by Spencer Johnson
  • The E Myth Revisited by Michael Gerber
  • In Search of Excellence by Tom Peters
  • The Balanced Scorecard: Transforming Strategy in Action by Robert Kaplan and David Norton
  • Good to Great by Jim Collins
  • Competitive Advantage by Michael Porter
  • Competitive Strategy by Michael Porter
  • Reengineering the Corporation by Michael Hammer and James Champy
  • Reengineering Management by Michael Hammer and James Champy
  • Principles of Scientific Management by Frederick Winslow Taylor
  • First, Break All the Rules by Marcus Buckingham
  • Now, Discover Your Strengths by Marcus Buckingham
  • Go, Put Your Strengths to Work by Marcus Buckingham
  • The Fifth Discipline by Peter Senge
  • Organizational Learning: a Theory of Action Perspective by Chris Argyris and DA Schoen
  • Blink by Malcolm Gladwell
  • Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell
  • Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell
  • Turn the Ship Around by L. David Marquet 
  • It’s Your Ship by Michael Abrashoff

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