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Defining Business Benefit

In a previous blog I wrote about the need for a high performance Service Desk with the value proposition being reduced re-work, less down time, better utilization of higher cost resources (knowledge management), increased stability and predictable levels of IT services.  In order to deliver this value, we must effectively communicate goals and business benefits in a language that the business finds relevant and meaningful.   Consequently, metrics and reporting should reflect business outcomes and business needs.

IT Support Metrics
  • Average speed of answer.
  • First Call Resolution.
  • Average Escalation Duration.
  • Total # of incidents recorded by: Service, CI, Assignment team.
IT Goal
  • Less down time, lower abandon rate, quicker speed of answer.
  • Less down time, lower abandon rate, greater use of knowledge bases.
  • Less Down time, predefined escalation paths, greater cooperation between technical resources.
  • Precise picture of which services and Cis, having the greatest impact on the organization. Capture of repeatable information and knowledge. Established ability to direct limited resources to permanently resolve underlying problems. SLAs can be met.
Business Benefit
  • If the phone is being answered quickly the caller is more likely to stay on the line for help.  Caller’s issues can then be resolved and they can return to creating business outcomes that much sooner.  Frustration is also reduced.
  • Caller is back to work sooner, creating business outcomes.  Greater satisfaction with services rendered.  More likely to utilize this single point of contact for future issues.
  • When issue is not resolved by level 1analyst, faster response time by level 2, speeds path to resolution and reduces downtime experienced by caller.
  • Properly analyzed information will result in corrective actions to be taken resulting in greater availability of services and greater reliability.
Organizational Benefit
  • More confidence in Service Desk capabilities, greater likelihood caller will use Service Desk again, less hallway muggings, greater effectiveness in use of resources, increased employee morale.
  • More confidence in Service desk capabilities, increased lines of communication between business and IT, more effective use of limited resources.  Reduced cost per resolution.
  • More confidence In Service Desk capabilities, greater sharing of knowledge between technical groups.  Less need for rediscovery of previously known knowledge. Callers will tell coworkers of positive experience, more efficient use of resources, less rework. 
  • More confidence in IT capabilities.  Encourage greater use of delivered services and expansion of Service Catalogue.  Earlier inclusion of IT in Project Management.
Above is an example of how we can begin to transform our IT centric reports into a more business focused direction.  This will allow greater understanding cooperation and alignment of Business and IT strategies.

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