Skip to main content

How Does ITIL Help in the Management of the SDLC?

I was recently asked how ITIL helps in the management of the SDLC (Software Development Lifecycle).  Simply put... SDLC is a Lifecycle approach to produce the software or the "product".  ITIL is a Lifecycle approach that focuses on the "service".

I’ll start by reviewing both SDLC and ITIL Lifecycles and then summarize:

SDLC  -  The intent of an SDLC process is to help produce a product that is cost-efficient, effective and of high quality. Once an application is created, the SDLC maps the proper deployment of the software into the live environment. The SDLC methodology usually contains the following stages: Analysis (requirements and design), construction, testing, release and maintenance.  The focus here is on the Software.  Most organizations will use an Agile or Waterfall approach to implement the software through the Software Development Lifecycle.


ITIL  -  is a best practice for IT service management (ITSM) that focuses on aligning IT services with the needs of the business and also follows a lifecycle approach.   The lifecycle stages in ITIL are Service Strategy, Service Design, Service Transition and Service Operation with ongoing Continual Service Improvement throughout. ITIL describes processes, procedures, tasks, and checklists which are not organization-specific, but can be applied by an organization for establishing integration with the organization's strategy, delivering value, and maintaining a minimum level of competency. It allows the organization to establish a baseline from which it can plan, implement and measure. It is used to demonstrate compliance and to measure improvement.

In Summary:
Both are required.  When ITIL best practices are not integrated into the SDLC (and vice versa) the development tends to become silo'd.  Developers focus on innovation and speed while operational functions focus on stability and governance.  This results in an us vs them environment. Without the integration of both, organizations are likely to experience bottlenecks, resources not being available when development needs them and incorrect data being collected (metrics are to show that "I did my job"... "It is there fault").  Other symptoms of these silos include inconsistent environments, manual build and deployment processes, poor quality and testing practices, lack of communication and understanding between IT silos, frequent outages and failing SLAs.  All of these issues require IT resources to spend significant time and money.

DevOps initiatives are working towards correcting these silos and breaking down walls throughout the delivery cycle and value stream. DevOps is the progression of the SDLC.  If ITIL (processes and activities) are not integrated early in the lifecycle the developers will continue to hit a brick wall that results in frustrated staff, high cost and little value to the business.

You might want to learn more about "Agile Service Management".   If your organization is utilizing Agile methods for software development then and Agile approach to ITIL/ITSM will help to ensure that your teams, processes, activities and business outcomes are in alignment.  Yes... I am suggesting an Agile approach to both SDLC and ITIL and also integrating them.  There is really only one "Value Stream".


For more information:  www.itsmacademy.com/agile    



Comments

Popular posts from this blog

What is the difference between Process Owner, Process Manager and Process Practitioner?

I was recently asked to clarify the roles of the Process Owner, Process Manager and Process Practitioner and wanted to share this with you. Roles and Responsibilities: Process Owner – this individual is “Accountable” for the process. They are the goto person and represent this process across the entire organization. They will ensure that the process is clearly defined, designed and documented. They will ensure that the process has a set of Policies for governance. Example: The process owner for Incident management will ensure that all of the activities to Identify, Record, Categorize, Investigate, … all the way to closing the incident are defined and documented with clearly defined roles, responsibilities, handoffs, and deliverables.  An example of a policy in could be… “All Incidents must be logged”. Policies are rules that govern the process. Process Owner ensures that all Process activities, (what to do), Procedures (details on how to perform the activity) and th

The Four Ps of Service Design - It’s not all about Technology

People ask me why I think that many designs and projects often fail. The most common answer is from a lack of preparation and management. Many IT organizations just think about the technology (product) implementation and fail to understand the risks of not planning for the effective and efficient use of the four Ps: People, Process, Products (services, technology and tools) and Partners (suppliers, manufacturers and vendors). A holistic approach should be adopted for all Service Design aspects and areas to ensure consistency and integration within all activities and processes across the entire IT environment, providing end to end business-related functionality and quality. (SD 2.4.2) People:   Have to have proper skills and possess the necessary competencies in order to get involved in the provision of IT services. The right skills, the right knowledge, the right level of experience must be kept current and aligned to the business needs. Products:   These are the technology managem

The ITIL Maturity Model

Most organizations, especially service management organizations, strive to improve themselves. For those of us leveraging the ITIL® best practices, continual improvement is part of our DNA. We are constantly evaluating our organizations and looking for ways to improve. To aid in our improvement goals and underscore one of the major components of the ITIL Service Value System , Continual Improvement .   AXELOS has updated the ITIL Maturity Model and is offering new ITIL Assessment services. This will enable organizations to conduct evaluations and establish baselines to facilitate a continual improvement program. A while back I wrote an article on the importance of conducting an assessment . I explained the need to understand where you are before you can achieve your improvement goals. Understanding where you are deficient, how significant gaps are from your maturity objectives, and prioritizing which areas to focus on first are key to successfully improving. One method many organi