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Are You Ready for the Football Season?

It’s that time of year where the kids are heading back to school, the seasons are about to change and YESSS it’s time for FOOTBALL!!!! The other night I was watching the HBO series NFL Hard Knocks about the Los Angeles Rams training camp and it dawned on me how much a football organization is like an ITSM organization and how they can incorporate the 12 Agile principles into their game plans.  I know your saying, what?? But hear me out and let me explain:

  1. Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer. Ultimately this means to win the Super Bowl, but we have to win each week against a different opponent, with different circumstances at each game. Weather, crowds, injuries all have to be adapted to.
  2. We have to welcome changes, even late in the game.  Some changes might not be so welcome but we have to be agile and adapt to whatever circumstances arise during game day. This may mean dealing with something bad or some opportunity presented to you during the game.  (Respond to change)
  3. Deliver working plays and a solid game plan each week against a different opponent.  Come up with new wrinkles in your plays to keep the other team off balance. (Deliver working software frequently)
  4. The front office, the owner, the coaching staff and the players all have to work together daily to be able to deliver a championship.  (Collaboration)
  5. Build game plans and plays around motivated people.  Who’s playing hard and delivering on offense and defense?  That’s who plays!
  6. Individual conversations, offensive line and defensive line meetings, receiver and quarter back meetings, defensive linebacker meetings, defensive and offensive meetings, whole team meetings. (Effective and efficient communication, face to face)
  7. Yards gained, points scored on offense.  Adversaries held to three plays and out. Interceptions or fumbled recoveries on defense.  (Working software)
  8. Build a depth chart and insure people train hard. (Sustainable activities)
  9. Come up with new wrinkles in your plays to keep the other team off balance. (Good design enhances agility)
  10. Maximize all your tools on offense, time of possession is key, rest your defense.
  11. Leaders rise out of the groups and keep teams motivated to win.
  12. After each game, watch film, dissect the plays both good and bad. Adjust accordingly.

For more information on IT Service Management and Agile click here:  http://www.itsmacademy.com/resourcecenter

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