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The Whitehouse - Transitioning of Power to the New Administration

So the election is over and we move into the transitioning of power to the new administration. This doesn’t officially happen until January 20th 2017. President elect Trump met with President Obama and so begins the transfer of Data, Information, Knowledge and Wisdom. So with such a short time the transfer between the transition teams and the operational teams has to happen quickly, efficiently and effectively.  This transfer of power has happened 43 times in our nation’s history with 11 happening so far in the postmodern era and the Obama to Trump administration being the twelfth. Can you say change model?

The ability to have this smooth transition rests to a significant extent on the ability of those involved to be able to respond to existing circumstances, their ability to understand the situation as it currently exists along with any options that may be available, along with the known consequences and benefits.  The quality, relevance and accessibility of this knowledge, information and data is critical to this smooth transitioning of power.

The purpose of this knowledge exchange (management) is to be able to share perspectives, ideas, experience and information and to ensure they are available to the right people at the right time. In this world of the IoT (internet of Things), and especially at the highest levels of government, reducing the need to rediscover important information is critical to our national security and continuity.

By safeguarding that the appropriate level of knowledge transfer takes place we can help to ensure:
  • That high quality decisions can be made based on reliable, secure, accurate and up to date information and that it is available throughout the transition period.
  • The continuation of government services without the interruption to those vital services that keep our country moving and secure.
  • That the staff of the incoming administration have a clear and common understanding of both the domestic and international circumstances that they will be leading us through and the options and constraints they will be facing.
  • They will have continued and controlled access that will allow them to feed forward the knowledge, information and data that will be needed to make strong wise judgments.
  • That they will have the systems and tools to be able to continue to gather, analyze, store, share, use and maintain data, information and knowledge that will allow us to continue to be the great nation that we have been in the past and will carry on to be in the future of this rapidly changing world.
And you thought that Knowledge Management was for IT professionals only!

For more information please see ITSM Academy's Service Transition and  Organizational Change.
  

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