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Why Am I Excited to Teach Site Reliabilty Engineering (SRE) Foundation?

I really like teaching Site Reliability Engineering (SRE) Foundation course. I find it really effective to link SRE Foundation to the learners’ needs of incorporating SRE core concepts to ITSM and DevOps (and any other framework!) 

This course allows me to explain how SRE improves operational excellence and quality, a key performance measure for ITSM. It also allows me to explain how SRE improves Automation, not only with the DevOps pipeline, but also how Ops uses this data to improve the flow of work into operations, and then automate repetitive tasks by utilizing tools (e.g., ChatOps). 

Most importantly, SRE improves collaboration with customers, defining Service Level Objectives (SLO’s) so that IT consistently achieves (and exceeds) customers’ expectations AND delivers VALUE for the organization. 

Automated monitoring is NOT enough these days, we must include observability, using automation to manage security, and ultimately delivering improved IT service quality to the business. By reducing toil, those manual mundane operational tasks that every organization performs, we can improve organizations’ culture and employee morale. 

Error budgets allow operations teams to implement those “IT changes” that seem to never seem to get prioritized, enabling IT to continue to meet the SLO’s, and have happier customers! 

In class, we discuss how Google pioneered these concepts and how many other organizations have adapted these to meet their organizational goals and objectives.

We find this class particularly effective in the dedicated classroom. Have a team of 6 or more who could benefit from this knowledge? Please reach out to the ITSM Academy team. 

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